Glazer: Scribe Conjures Batman in Weighing Prospects for College Football Playoffs

This reminds me of "Batman Begins"…

In 2014 a four team College Football Championship Series begins. As many of you know, the College Bowl groups and many college presidents and conference commissioners didn’t want this to happen. It makes college football much more like pro football. The Super Bowl, college style.

Hey, I like it.

A committee will decide on the four teams, based on the usual criteria – who they played, their records and pretty much the way it’s done now, save the BCS scoring system. The playing sites will be picked based on neutral locations, attendance and which cities want to pay to play.

For years the public’s been bitching that some teams in the No. 3 or even No. 4 spot are overlooked for a national title run. Why? Because they supposedly don’t have the playing credentials of the big boys.

Tradition favors the Alabama‘s over the BYU‘s.

Not anymore.

With four teams in, No. 1 playing No. 4 and No. 2 playing No. 3, it would appear far more fair with this new system.

And as we’ve seen in the NFL, a wild card team can get into the Super Bowl and even win it.

So now a No. 4  ranked team will have a chance in the new system.

Although, I suppose now the arguments will begin on which team deserves to be ranked No. 4 

It never really ends, does it?

The NFL doesn’t care who you played, it’s strictly a numbers game.

College will still look at who you are to a great extent. Still, this is a much better system.

And oh, the excitement, oh, the money.  A $5 billion price tag has been tossed about for the rights to the 12 year CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES on TV.

So what does this mean to the bowl games?

That’s still in the works, but yes, they will continue. However those not in on the big party might take bigger hits.

I feel people still love the Bowl Post Season. So much so that, for the most part, viewers and attendance will remain about the same for the lesser bowls teams like MU and K-State go to. All million of them.

Hey, it’s something to watch on the tube on a cold Monday night – it’s football – and you might win a buck or two.

What clearly remains unfair is the fact that college players are broke and don’t get paid.

That’s what causes so many of the NCAA‘s ssues with cheating.  Like players selling their autographs or signing things to get a buck. The same group that decided on these playoffs, should look into a way of helping the players out moneywise.

With billions being made, why not take care of the college athletes?

I know that opens the door to paying college basketball players also, but maybe it should. Those are the two college sports that attract the most eyeballs and TV dollars, so the players should get something to make their two to four years on the court or the field matter because very few go to the pros.

Well, we all wanted this, now it’s here, so enjoy.

A COLLEGE SUPER BOWL, I love it!

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7 Responses to Glazer: Scribe Conjures Batman in Weighing Prospects for College Football Playoffs

  1. Robin says:

    Help.
    …I’m failing to see the Batman connection.

    Please explain your headline to me!

  2. Hearne says:

    Well…
    Far be it from me to fully fathom the complex and wildly creative mind of Craig Glazer, but I think it has something to do with the new playoffs system being brand new. Kinda like when Batman began. How’s that?

  3. Kerouac says:

    No consensus or final arbiter ever, beyond subjective opine
    There will still be dissent no matter the ‘system’… the omitted lesser teams from divisions not I-A (AA & AAA) will remain a subjective matter, nee possible snub. Sort of like the 1963 San Diego Chargers of the AFL, who challenged the NFL Champion Chicago Bears to a game for bragging rights… NFL Commish Rozelle et al & Papa Bear Halas tucked tails and declined: Chargers of 1963 were the forefather nee model for the STL Rams ‘Greatest Show on Turf’ club some years later. Bears defense claimed to be as good any pro team history up to that point in time. Bears allowed 10 points per game 1963 while the Chargers averaged 29 per game offense. The NFL blinked, and the Chargers (rightfully) were able to claim they were ‘World Champions’ of pro football 1963 as such, six of one half a dozen the other.

    Three years later, college football too had dissenting claims to ‘we’re # 1’ as well. Was 1966 when 8-0 Notre Dame (AP and Coaches choice as #1) & 9-0 Michigan State (Football Research Poll’s #1 pick) played the famous regular season 10-10 tie game, each team aft claiming college football’s #1 spot in their own opinion & as such the ‘best’ team in America (Notre Dame and Michigan State both ended the season 9-0-1.) Interestingly, neither played in post season yet undefeated Alabama 10-0-0 did, beating Nebraska – yet 11-0-0 allowed them do no better finish #3 ranking AP. Meanwhile, the then small-college I-AA San Diego State finished 10-0-0 and won in post season, to finish # 1 ‘small’. The Helm’s Foundation listed Michigan State and Notre Dame as Co-National Champions, 1966.

    Vince Lombardi wondered about that though & may have indicated his choice when, following the GB Packers win over the KC Chiefs in Superbowl 1 January 1967, said “well, now I guess we”ll have to play Alabama to see who’s really # 1.” And so it went, goes & ever will, likely.

  4. Kerouac says:

    Same Bat channel, same Bat time…
    ‘Batman’ became the 1966 TV season’s #1 biggest hit / new show (before dying in ignominy the spring of 1968.) 1966 season was also the year both my Chiefs and Dodgers fell by the wayside, post season World Series and Superbowl. Fortunately, 1968 brought relief the form Peggy Lipton ‘The Mod Squad’ & psychedelic rock… life was good, if not the Chiefs until January 1970. Since then, eh…not so much.

  5. chuck says:

    I’m with Robin. Batman?
    ?

  6. Super Dave says:

    When you have bats in your belfry you can not be expected to make sense.

  7. Joker says:

    Haha!
    It’s a funny joke. Get it!

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